How to Preserve Flowers

Smarter gardeners give flowers room to breathe, and water them. But their dense coats of resin have a short life, which is why they're often strewn all over a deck or lawn — and often not enough — making flowers look like popovers. Here are a few tricks for preserving some of them, and then more smart ways to put them to work. The resin protects, but also limits growth. So any little trellis will look lush and green if you can keep it from looking too witheringly hermetic. The trellis will look lush and green if you can keep it from looking too witheringly hermetic. Water them right. That'll make the plants feel natural and warm, and it'll cut down on their risk of disease.
That'll make the plants feel natural and warm, and it'll cut down on their risk of disease. Plant in enough soil to maintain roots. Stored flowers tend to have only a couple of centimetres, so you'd better invest in some nice topsoil. Stored flowers tend to have only a couple of centimetres, so you'd better invest in some nice topsoil. Keep the soil moist but not soggy. Flowering flowers are waterlogged unless they get regular morning and evening showers (and overnight mists). Flowering flowers are waterlogged unless they get regular morning and evening showers (and overnight mists). When they are dry to the touch, cover with a damp sponge. As they wilt, the sponge will prevent air from entering them, which will make their flowers — and even the leaves — swell up like gourds.